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Feasibility of Identifying Families for Genetic Studies of Birth Defects Using the National Health Interview Survey

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dc.contributor.author Wyszynski, Diego F en_US
dc.contributor.author Nolan, Vikki G en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-01-09T20:53:55Z
dc.date.available 2012-01-09T20:53:55Z
dc.date.copyright 2004 en_US
dc.date.issued 2004-5-12 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Wyszynski, Diego F, Vikki G Nolan. "Feasibility of identifying families for genetic studies of birth defects using the National Health Interview Survey" BMC Public Health 4:16. (2004) en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1471-2458 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2144/2903
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the National Health Interview Survey is a useful source to identify informative families for genetic studies of birth defects. METHODS. The 1994/1995 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) was used to identify households where individuals with two or more birth defects reside. Four groups of households were identified: 1) single non-familial (one individual with one birth defect); 2) single familial (more than one individual with one birth defect); 3) multiple non-familial (one individual with more than one birth defect), and 4) multiple familial (more than one individual with more than one birth defect). The March 2000 U.S. Census on households was used to estimate the total number of households in which there are individuals with birth defects. RESULTS. Of a total of 28,094 households and surveyed about birth defects and impairments, 1,083 single non-familial, 55 multiple non-familial, 54 single familial, and 8 multiple familial households were identified. Based on the 2000 U.S. census, it is estimated that there are 4,472,385 households where at least one person has one birth defect in the United States and in 234,846 of them there are at least two affected individuals. Western states had the highest prevalence rates. CONCLUSIONS. Population-based methods, such as the NHIS, are modestly useful to identify the number and the regions where candidate families for genetic studies of birth defects reside. Clinic based studies and birth defects surveillance systems that collect family history offer better probability of ascertainment. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Massachusetts Center for Birth Defects Research and Prevention; Massachusetts Department of Public Health; Peer Foundation/Cleft Palate Foundation Etiology Research Grant en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher BioMed Central en_US
dc.rights Copyright 2004 Wyszynski and Nolan; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article: verbatim copying and redistribution of this article are permitted in all media for any purpose, provided this notice is preserved along with the article's original URL. en_US
dc.title Feasibility of Identifying Families for Genetic Studies of Birth Defects Using the National Health Interview Survey en_US
dc.type article en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/1471-2458-4-16 en_US
dc.identifier.pubmedid 15140264 en_US
dc.identifier.pmcid 420469 en_US


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