Christology in the Epistle to the Hebrews: Martin Luther's Reception of John Chrysostom

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dc.contributor.author Betz, Erin L
dc.date.accessioned 2010-05-27T19:30:54Z
dc.date.available 2010-05-27T19:30:54Z
dc.date.issued 2010-05-27T19:30:54Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2144/1346
dc.description.abstract Throughout the history of the Church, the Epistle to the Hebrews has been one of the most puzzling letters in the Canon, particularly regarding the implications of understanding the person of Jesus Christ. John Chrysostom, an important patristic writer, is acknowledged to have made significant contributions to the exegesis of this letter. Chrysostom's thought became the norm for traditional thinking and interpretation of this letter in the Middle Ages. Martin Luther's reception of Chrysostom's Homilies on Hebrews presents a unique interpretation that some scholars may describe as the "Reformation Discovery" on Hebrews. In tracing Luther's reception and appropriation of Chrysostom's exegesis of the letter to the Hebrews, there is a noticeable and significant shift in Christological interpretation. Whether or not these modifications were necessary is a matter of debate; however, they do reflect Luther's contextual and existential questions regarding faith, Christ and knowledge of God, which is evident in his Lectures on Hebrews. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.title Christology in the Epistle to the Hebrews: Martin Luther's Reception of John Chrysostom en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US

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