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dc.contributor.authorRosenfield, Daviden_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-23T18:48:24Z
dc.date.available2015-02-23T18:48:24Z
dc.date.issued1951
dc.date.submitted1951
dc.identifier.otherb24797832
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/10571
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston University Includes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this thesis is to discuss the role of invertebrate blood and body fluid cells in clot formation and related phenomena. Invertebrate blood physiology has been most extensively investigated in some crustaceans and in Limulus, a merostomatan. The insects have also been studied a good deal, and there has been some work on the annelids, mollusks, echinoderms, tunicates (ascidians), and others. The three most important hemostatic devices in vertebrates are (1) smooth muscle contraction, (2) blood cell agglutination, and (3) plasma coagulation. Among the mammalian blood cells only the platelets are important in clot formation, although the leukocytes may sometimes be involved. [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.titleThe agglutination of formed elements in the blood of invertebrates.en_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineBiologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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