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dc.contributor.authorCurran, Thomas Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-10T00:47:28Z
dc.date.available2015-03-10T00:47:28Z
dc.date.issued1951en_US
dc.date.submitted1951en_US
dc.identifier.otherb14735209en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/10645
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractIn tracing the growth of cartography the science, four basic elements were selected to assemble and organize the data collected. Those elements were: the shape of the earth, latitude, longitude and the projection. The earth, its shape and dimensions were described in early Greek Mythology. Then, it was believed te be an inverted disc supported by a series of pillars in the care of Atlas. About 523 B.C. Pythagoras pointed out to the scientific world that the earth was spherical in shape. It was left to Aristotle in 370 B.C. to prove that the earth was truly a sphere. Eratosthenes, the keeper of the famous library at Alexandria, Egypt, made a serious attempt to determine the earth's circumference. His result was stated to have been remarkably accurate, but unfortunately it was not accepted by later geographers. [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.titleGrowth of cartography, the science.en_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineCartographyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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