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dc.contributor.authorBower, Warren Cornellen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-23T16:47:48Z
dc.date.available2015-03-23T16:47:48Z
dc.date.issued1954en_US
dc.date.submitted1954en_US
dc.identifier.otherb14652997en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/10706
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Boston University N.B.: There is no page 193. Pages are misnumbered. No content is missing.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe incidence of dissatisfaction with occupation, of failure in one's chosen field, of occupational change after years of preparation, and, frequently, experience, as reported in the literature, poses a serious problem to workers in vocational counseling. Traditional tools used in this field--the interview, general ability or intelligence tests, special aptitude tests, interest inventories--while contributing greatly to efforts to improve our guidance processes, have been evaluated as insufficient by themselves. [TRUNCATED] A first sample of two hundred upperclass and first year graduate students among the four fields of forestry, mechanical engineering, psychology, and agriculture, were taken in equal numbers from the University of New Hampshire and the University of Maine. A second sample was taken similarly the next year, with no subject from the first sample included in the second one. A small sample of eight freshmen who had declared their intention to major in one of the four fields was taken at the University of New Hampshire. A small sample of eighty professional workers, all possessing at least a bachelor's degree in their field and a minimum of five years experience in the field was taken. [TRUNCATED] In the first three groups it was shown that there was no significant difference among the four major fields in regard to age, scholastic aptitude as measured by the American Council on Education Psychological Examination, socioeconomic status of the father, or residential area. It was not possible to gather this kind of information for the professional workers since many preferred not to give one or another form of personal information or identification. All subjects were male; both veterans and non-veterans were used. [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.titleRorschach patterns among groups of college majors at two New England universities.en_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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