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dc.contributor.authorKlass, Bertranden_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-31T05:37:48Z
dc.date.available2015-03-31T05:37:48Z
dc.date.issued1952
dc.date.submitted1952
dc.identifier.otherb14718248
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/10788
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractMorale has been defined as the sum of the satisfactions which the individual experiences because of his membership and involvement in an organization. Recently there has been a movement away from the study of the global morale concept to the different types of satisfactions that individuals derive from the industrial situation. Intrinsic job satisfaction is defined by the degree of satisfaction obtained by the individual employee from performing those tasks which constitute the content of his job. This study was concerned primarily with an investigation of the role of expectations as related to the extent of fulfillment of these expectations in determining intrinsic job satisfaction. Job importance, contribution made by doing the job, the work's relationship to the kind of work that public relations practitioners do, and statements as to how interesting or how uninteresting the work was,- were the major criteria used to structure expectations. Intrinsic job satisfaction was treated as the dependent variable. An attempt was also made to relate intrinsic job satisfaction levels to productivity levels. [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.subjectOpinion researchen_US
dc.titleThe role of expectations in determining intrinsic job satisfactionen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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