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dc.contributor.authorFoster, Linda Porteren_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-24T19:54:28Z
dc.date.available2015-04-24T19:54:28Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.date.submitted2014
dc.identifier.other
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/10994
dc.descriptionThesis (D.M.A.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractIn this study I used ethnographic techniques to examine reciprocal peer mentoring in a post-secondary piano course and to explore the influence of reciprocal peer mentoring on the learning environment, the sharing of knowledge and skills, and the perspective of the participants regarding the process of peer mentoring and social interaction. Findings included successful outcomes for learners in terms of understandings, skills, and dispositions in association with student affmity for the process. Participants preferred interactive learning, experienced an enhanced level of comfort as a result of the ongoing social interaction and peer validation, and found both dispositional and educational value in learning as part of a supportive community of learners. Themes included the effectiveness of peer communication; the value of exposure to multiple perspectives; the enhanced level of comprehension acquired through constructing knowledge with others; and the motivational and self-management benefits of monitoring personal learning through peer interaction. Reciprocal peer mentoring was observed to be efficient and effective; participants held a negative view of both traditional instruction and group learning that lacked shared authority and ongoing dialogue among knowledgeable peers. Participants expressed congruent perceptions regarding the effect of peer mentoring on social interaction. Themes included interdependent relationships and social bonding, enhanced efficacy, successful mentoring without training, and personal satisfaction in helping others. The positive academic, technical, and social results for students in this study speak to the self-actualizing power of constructivist and holistic ideals and may contradict two of the prevailing paradigms in the literature on peer mentoring in music education settings: teacher determination of a fixed role for each student for the duration of the process and the necessity of extensive mentor training. The results may have implications for the practice of music educators both in terms of the hierarchical power structure of traditional music instruction and the holistic development of student potential. These findings encourage the use of reciprocal peer mentoring within the discipline of music education, conceivably extending the observed benefits of this learning paradigm to a greater number of student musicians and contributing to the holistic development of student potential within the field.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.titleStudent to student: reciprocal peer mentoring in a post-secondary piano laben_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Musical Artsen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMusic Educationen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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