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dc.contributor.authorGuo, Ziningen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-24T19:56:22Z
dc.date.available2015-04-24T19:56:22Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.date.submitted2014
dc.identifier.other
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/11008
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractWhile institutional analysts have made strides in understanding industry emergence, we know little about why some nascent industries do not emerge. This study investigates what inhibits industry emergence and how. Drawing on the Cape Wind project (2001-2014), America's first offshore wind energy project proposal, this study shows that a systemic interplay of regulatory, social, technological, economic, and political factors delayed project development and inhibited industry emergence. The regulatory regime and the public were disengaged in their attention, interest, and values during and beyond the permitting process. While regulators focused on scientific issues requiring stable problem-solving methods, the public focused on social justice issues requiring emergent methods. The structural disengagement left the project in a quagmire of contestation despite regulatory success. This study contributes to economic sociology by identifying the factors and mechanisms that inhibit industry emergence. It enriches institutional studies by demonstrating the duality of structure and values in enabling actions and inducing outcomes. It contributes to innovation studies by integrating structure with content through a typology of four kinds of innovation.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.titleWhat inhibits industry emergence? The Cape Wind project and beyonden_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineStrategy and Innovationen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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