Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorAnthony, J. Pierce.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-02T21:03:42Z
dc.date.available2015-07-02T21:03:42Z
dc.date.issued1956
dc.date.submitted1956
dc.identifier.otherb14798761
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/11585
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractEver since the early days of Christianity music has been an integral part of the service of worship. In the beginning the whole congregation sang the responses, Psalms, and hymns. However, as the music became more elaborate, a nucleus of more skillful singers was developed to form a choir. The Council of Laodicea in the fourth century specifically stated that a choir would sing certain parts of the liturgy exclusively. A Schola Cantorum of school of singing was established by Pope Sylvester (314-35) to train priests in the art of scared music. This Schola rose in importance under Pope Hilary and Gregory. Ever since that time, the singers of the Schola have composed the choir which was officiated at Masses and ceremonies conducted by he Pope. Indeed, the methods of teaching and the quality and style of singing made the Schola Cantorum a model for the development of choirs and choir schools throughout Europe. [Truncated]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.titleChoirs and choir schools in the history of church music.en_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineChurch Musicen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record