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dc.contributor.authorMayer, Charlesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-29T19:16:04Z
dc.date.available2015-07-29T19:16:04Z
dc.date.issued1955en_US
dc.date.submitted1955en_US
dc.identifier.otherb14660258en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/11707
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractLashley has maintained that the problem of stimulus equivalence is of prime concern both to the neurophysiologist and the physiological psychologist. This stand becomes eminently justifiable when it is noted that stimulus equivalence is a limiting case of the more general phenomenon of stimulus generalization. That is, stimulus equivalence is tantamount to stimulus generalisation with a flat gradient. Both Lashley and Hebb have suggested theories to account for stimulus equivalence. Lashley's theory employs the concept of sensory equipotentiality. This concept implies that if an association is formed to a pattern of activity within a particular part of a sensory projection area (e.g., the visual projection area) the elicitation of that pattern in some other part of the sensory projection area will evoke the same associated response, even though that particular portion had never been previously stimulated. Lashley's concept thus provides for stimulus equivalence by some innate property of the nervous system. [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.titleTransfer from one cortical point to another using an imbedded electrode technic.en_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctorateen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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