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dc.contributor.authorKim, Josephen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-04T15:43:50Z
dc.date.available2015-08-04T15:43:50Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.date.submitted2013en_US
dc.identifier.otheren_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/12136
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: Properly functioning sensory systems are crucial in perception of external stimuli. Different modalities such as touch, temperature, and pain can only be appreciated with intact sensory pathways from the peripheral receptors to the cerebral cortex via the spinal cord. Pain is a sensory response to noxious, tissue damaging stimuli. It is an essential protective response for survival. However, abnormalities in sensory function may lead to hyposensitization or hypersensitization to a stimulus, which may cause numbness or pain respectively. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is a condition characterized by inflammation of the joints, resulting in stiffness and pain. The etiology of JIA is not well known, and little is understood about the associated changes in sensory function that may be present. In this study, we use quantitative sensory testing (QST) as a validated measure to assess local and global changes in sensory function in JIA patients. [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.titleQuantitative sensory testing for evaluation chronic arthritis or local anesthesiaen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMedical Sciencesen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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