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dc.contributor.authorPark, Hongchaien_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-04T15:59:21Z
dc.date.available2015-08-04T15:59:21Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.other
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/12181
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: Nocturia is one of the most common causes of sleep disruption and of reduced quality of life. This nocturnal tendency to void increases with age, and is reported to affect men more than women. The underlying causes of these age- and sex- related differences have been inconsistently explained in literature. There are age-related changes in sleep architecture and in the day-night rhythm of urine output, but how each of these changes influence nocturnal voiding is unclear. Furthermore, sex-related differences sleep architecture are not well linked to nocturia. Diminished urine output is achieved through urine concentration either via water reabsorption or sodium retention. There is a day-night variation in urine output in humans, with nighttime output in healthy young adults representing about 25% of total 24-hour production. A variety of hormones play a role in fluid and sodium balance, including vasopressin, atrial natriuretic peptide, and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Several of these hormones have been reported to show day-night variations, but whether these represent circadian rhythms or effects of day-night changes in behavior is not clear. Without understanding how diuretic and anti-diuretic hormones vary across day and night, their role in nocturia remains unclear. Furthermore, if changes in the amplitude of the circadian rhythm of such hormones occur with age, it represents a potential novel mechanism contributing to nocturia, and a potential therapeutic target.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.titleAltered circadian rhythms and sleep in aging and sex as factors in nocturiaen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMedical Sciencesen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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