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dc.contributor.authorShah, Pinkeyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-04T16:04:27Z
dc.date.available2015-08-04T16:04:27Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.date.submitted2013en_US
dc.identifier.otheren_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/12220
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractMelanoma is the least common of skin cancers but is the most aggressive subset. Arising from the melanocytes found in the epidermal-dermal junction of the skin, the disease has frequently been linked to increased exposure to UV irradiation in addition to significant genetic influences. Melanoma can be cured with surgical intervention if the lesion is detected at an early stage. However, prognosis is poor after melanoma has metastasized to other organs and there are few treatment options available outside of chemotherapy. Little is known about the molecular basis for the biological behavior of melanoma, making its clinical course somewhat unpredictable and rational treatment prioritization extremely difficult. Biomarkers are prognostic factors that mimic the biological tendencies of a tumor. They can be physical markers or molecular fingerprints. Identification of biomarkers in melanoma will allow clinicians and researchers to better predict the behavior of melanocytic tumors, thus allowing for a more optimal prioritization of treatment for each individual affected by this disease. Much research has gone into developing biomarkers related to genetic alterations associated with melanoma onset and progression; however independent confirmatory tests or data from clinical trials are still needed to validate the research. Recent studies have explored the relationship between cancer and the host’s immune response. Cancer cells are known to secrete cytokines and growth factors that influence its own aggressiveness. Moreover, the discovery of tumor associated antigens serve as more evidence that there is an immune response to cancer and hold promising clinical therapies for the future. [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.titleInvestigation of novel tissue biomarkers for the study of melanoma progressionen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMedical Sciencesen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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