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dc.contributor.authorChan, Kelvin Lim-sumen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-04T18:20:19Z
dc.date.available2015-08-04T18:20:19Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.submitted2012
dc.identifier.other(ALMA)contemp
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/12316
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.)--Boston University PLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractReconstituted collagen gels represent an ideal choice for the development of clinically relevant engineered vascularized scaffolds, but are typically too mechanically weak to resist deformation. The chemical crosslinker, genipin, has been used to increase the mechanical strength, reduce immunogenicity of tissues in vivo, and protect collagen against enzymatic degradation in vivo. It is not fully clear what effects genipin fixation of type I collagen gels has on human endothelial cell functionalized in vascularized scaffolds in vitro. We compared the vascular leakage of fluorescent solutes, lifespan, and viability of control, 1, and 20 mM genipin treated scaffolds under stable perfusion conditions and found no negative effects due to the genipin fixation of scaffolds. We subjected microvessels to two stressful perfusion conditions by reducing shear stress and by eliminating a positive transmural pressure. Interestingly the genipin treated scaffolds supported vessels with superior morphological stability and lifespan compared to control scaffolds. This study demonstrates that genipin fixed collagen scaffolds permit normal endothelial cell physiology and stabilize endothelial microvessels subjected to stressful perfusion conditions in vitro.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.titleGenipin crosslinked collagen microfluidic scaffolds form stable microvessels in vitro using human endothelial cellsen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineBiomedical Engineeringen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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