Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCutone, Benjaminen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-04T18:21:45Z
dc.date.available2015-08-04T18:21:45Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.submitted2012
dc.identifier.other(ALMA)contemp
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/12340
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.)--Boston University PLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractIntroduction and Hypothesis: The objective ofthis study was to determine the treatment rates of urinary incontinence (UI) in women 65 years old and older by education, poverty, and socioeconomic status (SES). Additionally, it was investigated ifhaving a discussion with a health care provider about UI had any effect on treatment rates. Methods: The publicly available 2007-2009 Medicare Health Outcome Survey data was examined in regards to four items that query about UI. All women 65 years old and older who provided data on UI and level of education were included in the analysis. United States Census Bureau data were used to establish poverty and SES variables. Results: In total, 87,805 women met inclusion criteria and 43.2% reported experiencing some UI in the past 6-months with only 28.6% receiving any treatment for UI. Women with a college education who self-reported either a "small" or "big" UI problem were more likely to receive treatment for their UI (OR = 0.84 (95% CI 0.79, 0.89)) and (OR= 0.77 (95% CI 0.69, 0.86). Women with a college education and any magnitude ofUI were also more likely to discuss their UI problem with a health care provider (OR = 0.93 (95% CI 0.88, 0.97)) and (OR= 0.80 (95% CI 0.72, 0.89)). For women with a small UI problem, a discussion with a provider was most impactful in regards to treatment for women without a college education. For women with a big UI problem, a discussion was most beneficial to treatment for women with a college education. Conclusion: UI is a prevalent condition among women 65 years old and older. Women without a college education are disadvantaged in regards to receiving any treatment for UI. Treatment rates may be improved among less educated women if providers initiate discussions regarding UI during the clinical encounter.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.titleFemale urinary incontinence and treatment rates among a Medicare populationen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineHealth Services and Outcomes Researchen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record