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dc.contributor.authorFerber, Kristynen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-04T20:19:30Z
dc.date.available2015-08-04T20:19:30Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.submitted2012
dc.identifier.other(ALMA)contemp
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/12375
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.)--Boston University PLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn 2009, the NAS published a report that was critical to forensic science, including the fingerprinting discipline. In particular, the report highlighted the fact that many of the claims made by LPEs are not backed up by scientific research. One of those claims is that if two fingerprints can be overlaid perfectly then one must be a copy. This study aims to provide research that will support or refute this claim and satisfy the demands of the NAS report. Additionally, this study was performed, in part, to show the ridge changes that occurred due to variations in pressure used when depositing a print on a surface. The study had 21 volunteers provide 10 sequentially laid fingerprints from the same finger. These prints were converted to a digital format. Each group's 10 fingerprints were individually overlaid onto each other in an effort to obtain the best possible agreement. Once this was done, the overlay percentage was determined. After all overlays were performed, additional data were collected to determine how ridge widths changed when there was a change in observable minutiae, presumably due to a decrease in the pressure used to generate the print. The data obtained indicate that, even when all variables other than the physical characteristic of the finger and the psychomotor capabilities of the volunteer are controlled, people are not able to generate prints that will perfectly overlay. Additionally, the data show that pressure distortion causes ridge widths to vary when prints are deposited. Moreover, minutiae loss in the print can also occur as a result of this type of distortion.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.titleQuantifying the uniqueness of fingerprints from the same sourceen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineBiomedical Forensic Sciencesen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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