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dc.contributor.authorLeclere, Flavien Ericen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-05T00:50:07Z
dc.date.available2015-08-05T00:50:07Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.submitted2012
dc.identifier.other(ALMA)contemp
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/12469
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston University PLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe rising rates of neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders have led to much discovery on their genetic abnormalities and clinical manifestations. However, the link between the genomics and phenotypes of these diseases has yet to be elucidated. Through proteomics, identification of protein complexes will be useful in defining the molecular mechanisms of these disorders at both the protein and systems levels. With the use of a stats database, the novel proteomic approach of CompPASS can be used to produce high confidence interaction networks for proteins encoded by disease-associated genes. Due to the cell-specificity of these protein complexes, a new stats database using physiologically relevant cells is needed to study neural disorders. In this study, we were able to express, immunoprecipate, and analyze by MS 50 different baits by using the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line. The new SH-SY5Y stats table was analyzed and found to correctly decipher background and high-confidence interacting proteins. Additionally, we provide validation for our approach as the analysis resulted in the identification of HCIPs that were not found by using the existing 293T cell stats database. The newly created SH-SY5Y stats table will help link the genetic abnormalities underlying neural disorders to their phenotypes. We hope this platform will eventually result in treatments to improve the quality of life of individuals suffering from these pathologies.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.titleGeneration of a proteomic database to reveal interactomes of human neural diseases associated-proteinsen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMedical Sciencesen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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