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dc.contributor.authorRabin, Ericken_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-05T04:15:15Z
dc.date.available2015-08-05T04:15:15Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.submitted2012
dc.identifier.other(ALMA)contemp
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/12594
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston University PLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Noahide code is one of the most versatile conceptual resources in the Jewish tradition. I begin my thesis by identifying some peculiarities regarding the status of the code itself: the order, number, and content of its laws are unclear; it was not publicly promulgated or expressed in general terms; as a matter of historical fact, Jews couldn't effectively enforce the commandments, nor was doing so clearly required or even expected, and so forth. Placing these thorny issues to one side, I move on to survey some of the varied applications of Noahide law in jurisprudence, criminal law, immigration law, just war theory, foreign policy, and even animal rights. Then I turn to what is in my view the most ambitious interpretation of the code, namely the claim that it is a form of Jewish natural law. After going over some of the arguments in favor of this move, I argue that- pace Rabbi David Novak in particular- the Noahide commandments cannot be properly understood a form of natural law theory. In casting doubt on this view through a mix of historical considerations, I also endeavor to salvage some sense of the Noahide code's vast importance for Jewish ethical thought. I conclude that the Noahide is more than merely divine fiat, but less than natural law, representing a complex and fragmented doctrine that can be only partially explained in terms of rational morality.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.titleMore difficult than flinty rock: natural law and the Noahide commandmentsen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePhilosophyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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