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dc.contributor.authorSywulka, Edward Ronalden_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-05T04:23:17Z
dc.date.available2015-08-05T04:23:17Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.submitted2012
dc.identifier.other(ALMA)contemp
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/12647
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston University PLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines how Bolivian folkloric music has been used to negotiate various national identities through a case study of an ensemble of evangelical Bolivian musicians active in the late 1960s and 1970s. Although members identified themselves as "Bolivian" through their words, clothing, and music, they also modified that image by omitting aspects of Bolivian folklore and performing many non-Bolivian songs from Latin America and North America. Through examination of their repertoire and exegesis of personal interviews, I show how the group simultaneously sought to deepen bonds with North American evangelicals while also promoting their distinctiveness as "Bolivians." I utilize ethnomusicologist Thomas Turino's concept of the cosmopolitan cultural formation (2003b) to explain the similarity between the multi-national agenda of the group's eclectic repertoire and the trans-state appeal of Bolivian folkloric music-all of which are cosmopolitan forms of music. I begin by describing Bolivian class relations, tracing the history of rural Andean Amerindians' marginalization in urban society through the 1952 Bolivian National Revolution, when indigenous peoples received citizenship. I also examine the urban appropriation of indigenous musical practices, culminating in the Bolivian folkloric "boom" of the late 1960s and 1970s and the state's use ofthe genre to encourage inclusive nationalism among Bolivians of all races and classes. In the midst of these societal changes, Bolivian Protestants were also redefining their identity, as their numbers increased and their dependence on foreign missionaries decreased. The music examined in this thesis was one attempt at forging a unique Bolivian evangelical identity.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.titleBolivian Protestant Evangelical music and identity in relation to Andean Amerindian indigenous music, mestizo folkloric traditions, and Bolivian national identityen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineEthnomusicologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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