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dc.contributor.authorZavagnin, Anthony Josephen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-05T04:29:13Z
dc.date.available2015-08-05T04:29:13Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.submitted2012
dc.identifier.other(ALMA)contemp
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/12695
dc.descriptionThesis (Ed.D.)--Boston University PLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractSocial studies teachers face a dilemma when addressing controversial issues in the classroom. Research supports the incorporation of controversial issues into the social studies curriculum as a means of encouraging authentic debate and deliberation among students. While research supports student engagement with controversial issues, the literature is far from consistent as to the role that teachers should play during these lessons. An important question remains unresolved: should teachers divulge their personal opinions to students when teaching lessons involving controversial issues? To examine disclosure, this study asks what underlies teacher decision-making regarding teacher disclosure of personal political beliefs during social studies lessons that involve controversial issues. This multiple case study interviewed twenty secondary social studies teachers across seven suburban schools about how they made disclosure decisions. 15 of the 20 teachers in this study practiced some form of teacher disclosure. For the majority of teachers, disclosure depended upon contextual factors that included the age of students, personal connection to the topic, perceptions of the school and greater community, and the nature of the topic under discussion. While the teachers in this study discussed many factors that guided classroom practice, the most prominent factor involved personal understandings of the appropriate role of the teacher during class lessons. This study involved teachers with a variety of teaching experiences, and found that teaching experience had relatively little impact on how teachers practiced disclosure. Teachers also provided best practice recommendations involving disclosure. Those who did practice disclosure recommended that teachers share their personal beliefs when the topic related to the curriculum, and towards the end of the class lesson. Participants also believed that teachers should balance controversial issues and expressly covey their beliefs to students so that there is no confusion between the teacher's personal beliefs and the curriculum. This study concluded that instead of a focus on whether teachers should practice disclosure, the conversation should shift to how teachers should practice disclosure based on the best practice recommendations voiced by participants.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.titlePolitics in the classroom: teacher political disclosure and the decision-making of secondary social studies teachersen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Educationen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineEducationen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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