Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDickstein, Benjamin D.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-07T03:12:32Z
dc.date.available2015-08-07T03:12:32Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.date.submitted2013en_US
dc.identifier.other(ALMA)contempen_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/12747
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Boston University PLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractService members returning from deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan consistently report high rates of behavioral health problems, such as posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and alcohol misuse. However, despite signs of treatment need, research suggests that mental health services are underutilized by military personnel. Although several factors have been hypothesized to undermine service use in the military, research investigating the relationship between hypothesized treatment-barriers and mental healthcare utilization has been scant and equivocal. Moreover, there has been limited investigation into factors that may facilitate mental health treatment-seeking. The aim of this study was to further examine predictors of mental healthcare utilization among returning service members, and to develop a multi-factorial model explaining the interplay among combat stress exposure, psychological distress, perceived barriers to care (stigma, logistical barriers, negative beliefs about treatment), facilitating factors (unit cohesion and post-deployment social support) and mental health service utilization. Data were collected from 447 active duty U.S. Marines one week, three months, and six months following return from Afghanistan. A four-stage analytic approach was used to test predictors of service use, examine latent measurement models, investigate the longitudinal associations between psychological distress and perceived treatment-barriers, and evaluate a multi-factorial model addressing the primary study aim. Findings from analytic stages 1 - 3 informed modeling decisions specified in the fourth and final stage. Results suggest that the perception of treatment-barriers has a deleterious effect on service members' psychological symptomatology, which may be reduced, in part, by leveraging unit cohesion and post-deployment social support. Contrary to expectations, only a modest relationship was observed between hypothesized treatment-barriers and mental health service use, and no direct effect was observed between facilitating factors and service utilization. More research is needed to replicate these findings; however, it appears that, in addition to targeting stigma and other perceived treatment-barriers, interventionists attempting to promote mental healthcare utilization in the military will need to broaden their investigation of constructs influencing service members' decisions to seek care. Recommendations for future work are discussed.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.titlePredictors of post-deployment mental healthcare utilization among active duty Marinesen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record