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dc.contributor.authorWang, Keen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-07T03:41:05Z
dc.date.available2015-08-07T03:41:05Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.date.submitted2013en_US
dc.identifier.other(ALMA)contempen_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/12879
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Boston University PLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn longitudinal biomedical research, outcome data are often collected on a categorical scale from multiple locations of the same individual over time. For example, an important feature of knee osteoarthritis (OA) is that severity of knee pain often fluctuates over time. Identifying risk factors that contribute to the fluctuation of knee pain severity can help elucidating the pathology of the disease hence is of great clinical and epidemiological value. Measurements of knee pain are usually knee-specific. This challenges data analysis since an approach needs to model the longitudinal transitions of the outcome and to account for correlation between a person's two knees at the same time. Here I propose a multistate Markov chain transition model with extensions that acconnt for longitudinal and within-cluster correlations. The model assumes discrete time and allows transitions over time between any two states of pain severity. The model is based on a generalized linear regression framework assuming a multinomial distribution for the outcome. First, marginal model based approaches were proposed. These approaches take advantage of the robust sandwich vanance estimator and within-cluster resampling techniques to account for correlation within each cluster. Then, Bayesian random effect model based approaches were employed. Correlations among observations within each cluster are accounted for by including random effects into the model. Both the marginal model based approaches and the random effect models based approaches were evaluated by simulation studies. The models were then used to assess the effect of depression on transitions of knee pain severity in the Osteoarthritis Initiative study. A proportional odds model was further developed to deal with situations where the outcomes are ordinal. The models proposed in this dissertation extend the existing literatures in handling multilevel correlation when estimating effects of risk factors on longitudinal transitions of a categorical outcome. They can be especially helpful for investigation of disease progression or for prognostic purpose.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.titleMultistate Markov chain transition models for clustered longitudinal categorical data: application to a knee pain severity studyen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineBiostatisticsen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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