Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSoria-Saucedo, Reneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-18T16:54:32Z
dc.date.available2015-08-18T16:54:32Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.date.submitted2014
dc.identifier.other(ALMA)contemp
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/12943
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractDepressive disorders, more specifically major depressive disorder and dysthymia are serious, disabling illnesses. Approximately one in five persons is affected by a mood disorder at some point. My thesis examines the utilization rates of several pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic options of treatment for depression in a privately insured population in the US. The purpose of this study is to increase knowledge related to utilization patterns of pharmaceuticals or psychotherapy and yield recommendations to increase primary care capacity to deal with mental illnesses and acknowledge the variability of treatment in terms of geographical location and insurance type. Results indicate that large proportions of depressed children, adolescents and adults are not receiving any treatment or are receiving treatments unsupported or equivocally supported by empirical evidence. For insurance variation, managed care is more likely to utilize more established medication therapy with more robust evidence supporting their effectiveness. Finally, this study found large geographical variation that couldn't be explained on the basis of illness severity, guideline-concordance, or subject's characteristics. The extent to which this variation reflects system inefficiencies or inappropriate care is discussed.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.titleUtilization of antidepressants, antipsychotics, and psychotherapy among privately insured individuals with depression: association with guideline concordance, regional variation and insurance architectureen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineHealth Services Researchen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record