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dc.contributor.authorCohen, David Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-05T15:43:14Z
dc.date.available2015-10-05T15:43:14Z
dc.date.issued1952
dc.date.submitted1952
dc.identifier.otherb14763278
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/13193
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractThe century old boundary dispute between Ecuador and Peru is still going on. In the past the dispute concerned three sections of territory: 1) the Oriente area (including the Mainas region, the eastern slope of the Andes, and several tributaries of the Amazon); 2.) a southerly district known as Jaen; and 3) the Tumbes district on the Pacific coast. The major problems had been settled in successive treaties and protocols, the last one in 1942. Today the issue is one of interpretation of the 1942 Protocol. A scientifically accurate geographic survey in 1946 revealed new features of the Cenepa river formerly unknown. Because of this, the problem has assumed new significance and needs some clarification. The territories we now know as Ecuador and Peru comprised a large part of the Inca Empire. Internally split, the Empire began to disintegrate in the early 16th century, at which time Spain conquered and later colonized the territory. It was under the Spanish colonial administrations that the seeds for future boundary disputes were sown. Many of the Spanish royal decrees establishing Audiencias were confused and wordy. [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.titleThe current Peruvian-Ecuadoran border dispute and its background.en_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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