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dc.contributor.authorStephen, Emily Patriciaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-07T20:05:12Z
dc.date.available2016-01-07T20:05:12Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/13733
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding how communication between brain areas evolves to support dynamic function remains a fundamental challenge in neuroscience. One approach to this question is functional connectivity analysis, in which statistical coupling measures are employed to detect signatures of interactions between brain regions. Because the brain uses multiple communication mechanisms at different temporal and spatial scales, and because the neuronal signatures of communication are often weak, powerful connectivity inference methodologies require continued development specific to these challenges. Here we address the challenge of inferring task-related functional connectivity in brain voltage recordings. We first develop a framework for detecting changes in statistical coupling that occur reliably in a task relative to a baseline period. The framework characterizes the dynamics of connectivity changes, allows inference on multiple spatial scales, and assesses statistical uncertainty. This general framework is modular and applicable to a wide range of tasks and research questions. We demonstrate the flexibility of the framework in the second part of this thesis, in which we refine the coupling statistics and hypothesis tests to improve statistical power and test different proposed connectivity mechanisms. In particular, we introduce frequency domain coupling measures and define test statistics that exploit theoretical properties and capture known sampling variability. The resulting test statistics use correlation, coherence, canonical correlation, and canonical coherence to infer task-related changes in coupling. Because canonical correlation and canonical coherence are not commonly used in functional connectivity analyses, we derive the theoretical values and statistical estimators for these measures. In the third part of this thesis, we present a sample application of these techniques to electrocorticography data collected during an overt reading task. We discuss the challenges that arise with task-related human data, which is often noisy and underpowered, and present functional connectivity results in the context of traditional and contemporary within-electrode analytics. In two of nine subjects we observe time-domain and frequency-domain network changes that accord with theoretical models of information routing during motor processing. Taken together, this work contributes a methodological framework for inferring task-related functional connectivity across spatial and temporal scales, and supports insight into the rapid, dynamic functional coupling of human speech.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subjectCoherenceen_US
dc.subjectElectrocorticographyen_US
dc.subjectFunctional connectivityen_US
dc.subjectNetworksen_US
dc.subjectSpeechen_US
dc.subjectCanonical correlationen_US
dc.titleCharacterizing dynamically evolving functional networks in humans with application to speechen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2015-11-03T13:16:20Z
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineNeuroscienceen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International