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dc.contributor.authorMandehr, Kellen Franklynen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T14:58:19Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T14:58:19Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/14313
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Early identification of pediatric patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease, is important to help clinicians design optimal treatment regimens. Existing endoscopic techniques are effective in identifying disease activity. However, these methods are invasive, expensive, and less amenable to serial measurement. Recent studies have identified potential serologic and fecal biomarkers that may have the potential to provide clinicians with a more objective evaluation of disease activity. In the case of ulcerative colitis (UC), in which disease is confined to the large intestine, the information provided by fecal biomarkers is likely to be more specific than that provided by serologic biomarkers. Fecal lactoferrin (FLA) is one such biomarker that has shown to be useful not only in identifying levels of colonic inflammation, but also for use as a predictor of disease relapse and treatment efficacy. Measurement of fecal lactoferrin, in conjunction with information provided by other diagnostic modalities could expedite patient assessment and treatment. Additionally, it has been suggested that fecal lactoferrin levels may also provide prognostic information about response to treatment and disease outcome in pediatric patients with UC. The goal of this study is to explore the relationship between changes in FLA levels and response to medical therapy in hospitalized pediatric patients with UC. METHODS: Serial stool samples were collected daily from 10 patients admitted for management of severe active UC. Of these 10 patients, 3 responded favorably to standard treatment with intravenous corticosteroid therapy and were discharged to complete a course of oral steroids. 7 were unresponsive to steroid therapy and went on to require rescue (more intensive) medical therapy. Changes in FLA were correlated with steroid response and medical disposition at the time of discharge. RESULTS: A t-test was performed to determine the significance of the differences in percent change in FLA levels between patients discharged on steroids and patients discharged on rescue therapy. Patients discharged on steroids demonstrated a net decrease in FLA levels over the course of the first three days of steroid treatment while patients ultimately requiring rescue medical therapy demonstrated a net increase in FLA levels (mean values = -64.4% and +203.8%, respectively). A difference was found between the averages; however, this value did not reach statistical significance when analyzed with a t-test (p = 0.18). CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that quantitative FLA levels may prove useful in predicting clinical course and discharge outcome in pediatric patients with ulcerative colitis. Future research in this field should seek larger sample sizes, increased longitudinal sample collection, and the potential for a composite assessment that will yield additional objective measures of disease activity.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectMedicineen_US
dc.subjectBiomarkersen_US
dc.subjectIBDen_US
dc.subjectFecal lactoferrinen_US
dc.subjectUlcerative colitisen_US
dc.titleThe utility of fecal lactoferrin measurements in predicting disease activity of hospitalized patients with ulcerative colitisen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2016-01-22T18:55:47Z
etd.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMedical Sciencesen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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