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dc.contributor.authorDwyer, Daniel P.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-12T19:00:51Z
dc.date.available2016-02-12T19:00:51Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/14405
dc.description.abstractWith recent research being conducted in categorizing and analyzing the human microbiome, evidence has now linked the human microbiome to a range of diseases. Dysbiosis of the human gut microbiome exists in colon cancer, obesity, and Clostridium difficile infections. The use of fecal microbiota transplants has been proven effective in treating recurrent C.difficile infections by restoring gut microbiota. More needs to be done to establish fecal microbiota transplants procedures, effectiveness, and safety. Once established, fecal microbiota transplants may play a role in modulating other diseases linked to human gut microbiome dysbiosis.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectMedicineen_US
dc.subjectClostridium difficileen_US
dc.subjectFecalen_US
dc.subjectHumanen_US
dc.subjectMicrobiomeen_US
dc.subjectMicrobiotaen_US
dc.subjectTransplanten_US
dc.titleThe human gut micro biome and future role of fecal microbiota transplantsen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2016-01-22T18:56:56Z
etd.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMedical Sciencesen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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