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dc.contributor.authorSi, Weien_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-26T16:31:47Z
dc.date.available2016-02-26T16:31:47Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/14627
dc.description.abstractWith the emergence of connected and autonomous vehicles, sensors are increasingly deployed within car. Traffic generated by these sensors congest traditional intra-vehicular networks, such as CAN buses. Furthermore, the large amount of wires needed to connect sensors makes it hard to design cars in a modular way. These limitations have created impetus to use wireless technologies to support intra-vehicular communication. In this dissertation, we tackle the challenge of designing and evaluating data collection protocols for intra-car networks that can operate reliably and efficiently under dynamic channel conditions. First, we evaluate the feasibility of deploying an intra-car wireless network based on the Backpressure Collection Protocol (BCP), which is theoretically proven to be throughput-optimal. We uncover a surprising behavior in which, under certain dynamic channel conditions, the average packet delay of BCP decreases with the traffic load. We propose and analyze a queueing-theoretic model to shed light into the observed phenomenon. As a solution, we propose a new protocol, called replication-based LIFO-backpressure (RBL). Analytical and simulation results indicate that RBL dramatically reduces the delay of BCP at low load, while maintaining its high throughput performance. Next, we propose and implement a hybrid wired/wireless architecture, in which each node is connected to either a wired interface or a wireless interface or both. We propose a new protocol, called Hybrid-Backpressure Collection Protocol (Hybrid-BCP), for the intra-car hybrid networks. Our testbed implementation, based on CAN and ZigBee transceivers, demonstrates the load balancing and routing functionalities of Hybrid-BCP and its resilience to DoS attacks. We further provide simulation results, obtained based on real intra-car RSSI traces, showing that Hybrid-BCP can achieve the same performance as a tree-based protocol while reducing the radio transmission power by a factor of 10. Finally, we present TeaCP, a prototype Toolkit for the evaluation and analysis of Collection Protocols in both simulation and experimental environments. TeaCP evaluates a wide range of standard performance metrics, such as reliability, throughput, and latency. TeaCP further allows visualization of routes and network topology evolution. Through simulation of an intra-car WSN and real lab experiments, we demonstrate the functionality of TeaCP for comparing different collection protocols.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectElectrical engineeringen_US
dc.subjectHybrid networksen_US
dc.subjectInternet of thingsen_US
dc.subjectIntra-vehicular networksen_US
dc.subjectOpen-source toolkiten_US
dc.subjectRouting protocolsen_US
dc.subjectWireless sensor networksen_US
dc.titleIntegrating wireless technologies into intra-vehicular communicationen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2016-02-17T23:18:57Z
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineSystems Engineeringen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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