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dc.contributor.authorBurt, Daniel Roberten_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-29T19:03:41Z
dc.date.available2016-02-29T19:03:41Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/14650
dc.description.abstractGenetically based Central Nervous System (CNS) disorders remain a largely unresolved issue in the world today. Our genome is the source of our greatest strengths and weaknesses. For this reason, intelligent modification of the genome's DNA is a profoundly beneficial goal in the maximization of the overall health of the human race. Potential benefit in this field is currently limited in both effectiveness and safety in regards to the delivery of therapeutic genes into the nucleus, which is protected by many evolution-based barriers. Evolution has also favored the development of highly specialized and infectiously effective viruses capable of overcoming such boundaries. By neutering the naturally occurring and pathologically benign Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) we have transformed what was once a virus, into a "pure" vector, taking full advantage of evolution's diligent enhancement of these genetic hijackers without introducing unacceptable danger to patients. We utilized the logically engineered, castrated form of AAV serotype 9 (recombinant AAV9/rAAV9) to act as a vehicle for two reporter genes, Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP) and Firefly Luciferase (Fluc) with the goal of assessing and improving the efficiency of vector transduction in murine CNS. We found that rAAV9, when infused into the intrathecal space of mice is capable of extensive and intensive transduction of both neurons and astrocytes throughout the entire length of the SC as well as the hind regions of the brain (brainstem and cerebellum). We also found that efficiency of transduction was best in our highest dose groups, 1E+12 genome copies (GC) in Experiment 1 and 2E+12 GC in Experiment 2, both of which received rAAV9 particles via the two commercially available (100μL and the 200μL) ALZET® Osmotic Pump designs. Administering dosage higher than this directly into the intrathecal space was limited by the size of the pump reservoir and rAAV9 production titer. We are currently attempting to achieve a more complete CNS transduction by performing another experiment in which we place the pump cannula directly into the intracerebroventricular (ICV) space of the lateral ventricles. Our findings reveal that infusion of rAAV9 by intrathecal placed pump cannula is more effective than any other method tested in this study int the transduction of neurons and glial cells of adult&ndashmouse CNS. By elucidating a mode of delivery that maximizes the robustness of transduction efficiency, our results are a critical building block in designing a cure for the array of genetic-based diseases of the CNS, which are currently untreatableen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectBiologyen_US
dc.subjectAAVen_US
dc.subjectCNSen_US
dc.subjectAdeno-associated virusen_US
dc.subjectCentral nervous systemen_US
dc.subjectGene therapyen_US
dc.subjectTransductionen_US
dc.titleOptimization of viral transduction in the central nervous systemen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2016-01-22T18:57:02Z
etd.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMedical Sciencesen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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