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dc.contributor.authorHollander, Ruthen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-03T16:44:03Z
dc.date.available2016-03-03T16:44:03Z
dc.date.issued1959
dc.date.submitted1959
dc.identifier.otherb14702368
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/15029
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractDewey's aesthetic theory represents the culmination of his general philosophy of experience, and might best be interpreted as the final statements of his socio-ethical theory and his metaphysical world-view. Art As Experience is not only Dewey's explicit statement about art and aesthetic experience, but a further enrichment of his crucial concept of experience. This enriched focus upon experience enhances its significance and meaning only at the expense of certain distinctions and ambiguities with respect to terminology and method. In making a fundamental distinction between any ordinary process of experiencing and an aesthetic experience, Dewey seems to violate what, for him, is a basic methodological principle. To distinguish is to make an unnatural bifurcation; moreover, to select one thing as more meaningful and valuable than another is to commit the fallacy of artificial simplification, or to tear something out of context and give it an unnatural superiority over all else. [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.titleDewey's aesthetic theory.en_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePhilosophyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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