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dc.contributor.authorMayer, Chaden_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-23T17:56:04Z
dc.date.available2016-03-23T17:56:04Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/15270
dc.description.abstractEnterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) infection is a leading cause of acute kidney failure in otherwise healthy children, and a leading cause of foodborne illness with an outsized economic impact from outbreaks. EHEC secrete two Shiga-like toxins (Stx1 and Stx2) which are AB5 holotoxins that inhibit protein synthesis in cells expressing the toxin receptor Gb3. Infection with EHEC typically begins with a diarrheal prodrome that can progress in 5-15% of cases to hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a clinical diagnosis characterized by thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, and thrombotic microangiopathy. Historically, strains of EHEC expressing Stx2 have been associated with more severe disease. We hypothesized that tissue injury due to the toxins leads to the release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which act through inflammatory receptors to promote the endothelial dysfunction that drives this disease alongside the inciting Shiga toxins. Here we demonstrate that two well-characterized DAMPs, extracellular histones and HMGB1, are produced in two different mouse models when Stx2 is present; one model represents challenge with the toxin alone, and the second model introduces toxin through secretion with a lysogenized bacterium, C. rodentium, mimicking EHEC colonization. We investigate whether Stx1, Stx2, or histones affect the endothelial expression of well-characterized members of the protein C pathway, namely the endothelial protein C receptor (ECPR), protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1), and thrombomodulin (TM), on human aortic (HAEC) and human renal glomerular endothelial cells (HRGEC). We show that Stx and/or histones reduce endothelial expression of these anti-coagulant molecules and histones dramatically increase expression of pro-thrombotic PAR-1. These changes lead to physiologically important decreases in activated protein C (APC), a critical anti-coagulant and cytoprotective molecule. Finally, we demonstrate that histones exacerbate thrombin's barrier-disruptive effects on the endothelium, and prevent APC's protective effects. These data provide novel mechanistic insight into the endothelial dysfunction that characterizes HUS and also provide a new perspective on systemic consequences of the bacterial Shiga toxins that might drive organ injury in susceptible patients.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectMedicineen_US
dc.subjectDAMPsen_US
dc.subjectEHECen_US
dc.subjectProtein Cen_US
dc.subjectSTECen_US
dc.subjectHemolytic uremic syndromeen_US
dc.subjectShiga toxinsen_US
dc.titleShiga toxins and damage-associated molecular patterns leading to endothelial dysfunctionen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2016-03-12T07:10:39Z
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePathology & Laboratory Medicineen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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