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dc.contributor.authorSegal, Amanda Rachel
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-30T13:52:21Z
dc.date.available2016-03-30T13:52:21Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/15359
dc.description.abstractIodine is an essential element for the production of thyroid hormone, which is required for fetal cognitive development during pregnancy. Changes in maternal metabolism and physiology increase iodine requirements, and even mild iodine deficiency may lead to adverse effects on fetal neurodevelopment. While overall iodine intake in the United States is considered to be sufficient, there have been recent concerns about mild deficiency among women of childbearing years. Potentially exacerbating this issue amongst Haitian-American women is the known occurrence of iodine deficiency in Haiti. Attempts to supplement iodized salt by UNICEF have been unsuccessful due to Haiti's current political climate. Haitian immigrant women living in the United States may be at particular risk for iodine deficiency during pregnancy due to their unique dietary patterns. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 21 pregnant Haitian women living in the Boston area in order to determine if they are ingesting adequate dietary iodine. Our subjects included women with singleton pregnancies, who were not taking any thyroid hormone or anti-thyroid medication, and who were recruited at the Antenatal Clinic at Boston Medical Center. We obtained spot urine iodine concentrations, as well as information pertaining to iodine-containing prenatal vitamin use. To date, this has been the only such study carried out in this particularly vulnerable ethnic group and this study provides information of public health importance.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectEndocrinologyen_US
dc.titleIodine status of pregnant Haitian-American womenen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertation
dc.date.updated2016-03-12T07:11:51Z
etd.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMedical Sciencesen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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