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dc.contributor.authorDiMauro, Audreyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-01T15:27:49Z
dc.date.available2016-04-01T15:27:49Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/15401
dc.description.abstractMemory formation and recall depend on a complex circuit that includes the hippocampus and associated cortical regions. The goal of this thesis was to understand how two of the cortical connections, the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), influence spatial and nonspatial activity in the hippocampus. Cells in the MEC exhibit prominent spatially selective activity and have been hypothesized to drive place representation in the hippocampus. In Experiment 1 the MEC was transiently inactivated using the inhibitory opsin ArchaerhodopsinT (ArchT), and simultaneous recordings from CA1 were made as rats ran on an elliptical track. In response to MEC disruption some cells in the hippocampus shifted the preferred location of activity, some changed firing rate and others were unaffected. The new representation that developed following MEC disruption remained stable despite the fact that inhibition was transient. If the MEC is the source of spatial activity in the hippocampus the activity would be either time-locked to periods of inhibition or unstable throughout the period of inconsistent input. These results show that the MEC guides spatial representation in the hippocampus but does not directly drive spatial firing. The mPFC is generally thought to guide behavior in response to contextual elements. Experiment 2 examined the interaction between the mPFC and the hippocampus as rats performed a contextual discrimination task. Recordings were made in CA1, and the mPFC was disrupted using ArchT during the odor sampling phase of the discrimination. As animals perform this task neurons in the hippocampus respond to a conjunction of odor and location which indicates an association of what and where information in the hippocampus. Optogenetic disruption of the mPFC led to a decrease in nonspatial representation. Individual cells showed lower levels of odor selectivity, but there was no change in the level of spatial representation. This indicates that the mPFC is important for determining how the hippocampus represents nonspatial information but does not alter the spatial representation. The results are discussed within a model of memory formation that includes binding spatial and nonspatial information in the hippocampus.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subjectElectrophysiologyen_US
dc.subjectHippocampusen_US
dc.subjectOptogeneticsen_US
dc.subjectEntorhinal cortexen_US
dc.subjectPrefrontal cortexen_US
dc.titleFunctional interactions between the hippocampus, medial entorhinal cortex and medial prefrontal cortex for spatial and nonspatial processingen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2016-03-12T07:12:44Z
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePharmacology & Experimental Therapeuticsen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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