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dc.contributor.authorAisenberg, Ruth B.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-07T15:21:52Z
dc.date.available2016-04-07T15:21:52Z
dc.date.issued1957
dc.date.submitted1957
dc.identifier.otherb14655913
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/15454
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractAccording to Jenkins' theory, schizophrenia is occasioned by frustration which exceeds the individual's tolerance. One initiated, the schizophrenic's maladaptive behavior results in further frustration which leads to even more maladaptive behavior and is thus responsible for the regressive process of schizophrenic disorganization. Jenkins states that the process is reversible: Reward can bring about a recession of the symptoms. The results of existing studies of the effects of reward and punishment on schizophrenic behavior are conflictual. The present experiment is an attempt to test Jenkins' theory as it applies to this problem. [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.titleThe cumulative differential effects of reward and punishment on the performance of schizophrenic and normal subjects.en_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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