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dc.contributor.authorCox, David Franklin
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-07T15:22:27Z
dc.date.available2016-04-07T15:22:27Z
dc.date.issued1953
dc.date.submitted1953
dc.identifier.otherb14650368
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/15488
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Boston University
dc.description.abstractIt is the problem of this dissertation to discover, describe, and evaluate Karl Marx's philosophy of value or worth (as distinct from his economies of value). Examination of his thought reveals that Marx had no explicit, systematic value theory. Attention therefore is turned to the task of constructing Marx's philosophy of value, on the basis of his various value judgments, value principles, and general theory. This task is complicated by textual and interpretative problems in the writings of Marx, as well as by widely held misinterpretations of Marx. But these problems are not insurmountable, nor even especially unusual. The first element in constructing Marx's value theory is a review of his method. Three approaches in Marx are revealed: the humanistic, the historical or scientific, and the dialectical. Each is prominent in Marx, and each yields its characteristic approach to value. [TRUNCATED]
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston University
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.
dc.titleKarl Marx's philosophy of value.
dc.typeThesis/Dissertation
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
etd.degree.leveldoctoral
etd.degree.disciplinePhilosophy
etd.degree.grantorBoston University


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