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dc.contributor.authorGoodnow, E Russell
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-07T15:24:51Z
dc.date.available2016-04-07T15:24:51Z
dc.date.issued1960
dc.date.submitted1960
dc.identifier.otherb14708528
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/15524
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston University
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this thesis is to explain, interpret, and evaluate critically Brand Blanshard's theory of ideas as given in his magnum opus, The Nature of Thought. The method of analysis employed is primarily comparative. Chapter One is a direct exposition of Blanshard's theory. Chapter Two investigates Blanshard's relationship to his immediate predecessors, the English and American absolute idealists, in order to determine whether or not his revision of their thesis is major or minor, and at what points. Chapter Three is an analysis of Brand Blanshard's reply to neo-realism and critical realism which allegedly "refuted" absolute idealism. Chapter Four is concerned with a critical evaluation of Blanshard's theory of ideas. The study discloses that Brand Blanshard's definition of the nature of thought is best expressed by the word purpose. An idea is a purpose to become its object. Mind is a process which discloses its own nature and the nature of reality as it approaches fulfilment of its inner goal. The immanent goal of the mind is satisfied only when all of its objects have been related in necessary system. Achievement of this end is also a revelation of reality, the transcendent end of thought. In present experience the two ends of thought are distinct though not discrete. Ideas in the mind are potential forms of the actual world. Therefore, ideas can be accepted as truly revealing reality since they are reality (potentially), yet ideas may be incorrect since they are not reality (actually). [TRUNCATED]
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston University
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.
dc.titleBrand Blanshard's theory of ideas.
dc.typeThesis/Dissertation
etd.degree.nameMaster of Arts
etd.degree.levelmasters
etd.degree.disciplinePhilosophy
etd.degree.grantorBoston University


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