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dc.contributor.authorHill, Warren Thomasen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-07T15:25:05Z
dc.date.available2016-04-07T15:25:05Z
dc.date.issued1959
dc.date.submitted1959
dc.identifier.otherb14670057
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/15544
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractModern psychoanalytic theory has been primarily concerned with ego functions. Negation is thought to be one of the most basic ego functions--if not the most basic ego function. Freud first introduced the concept in 1915 with his paper, "The Unconscious", and then further developed it in his paper entitled "Negation" in 1925. Jones and Spitz have both made recent theoretical contributions that serve to clarify and extend the meaning of the concept. Basically, negation, as a thought mechanism, serves adaptation by allowing a repressed or inhibited idea to enter consciousness to be used for consciously acceptable purposes, on the condition that the idea is consciously disbelieved. The mechanism of negation tends to allay the painful affect or anxiety that is connected with an unacceptable idea. [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.titleNegation and related levels of defensive verbal behavior.en_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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