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dc.contributor.authorKeiser, George Roberten_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-08T17:55:30Z
dc.date.available2016-04-08T17:55:30Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/15653
dc.description.abstractTerahertz (THz) frequencies comprise the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum more energetic than microwaves, but less energetic than infrared light. The THz band presents many opportunities for condensed matter physics and optics engineering. From the physics perspective, advances in the generation and detection of THz radiation have opened the door for spectroscopic studies of a range of solid-state phenomena that manifest at THz frequencies. From an engineering perspective, THz frequencies are an under-used spectral region, ripe for the development of new devices. In both cases, the challenge for researchers is to overcome a lack of sources, detectors, and optics for THz light, termed the THz Gap. Metamaterials (MMs), composite structures with engineered index of refraction, n, and impedance, Z, provide one path towards realizing THz optics. MMs are an ideal platform for the design of local EM field distributions, and far-field optical properties. This is especially true at THz frequencies, where fabrication of inclusions is easily accomplished with photolithography. Historically, MM designs have been based around static configurations of resonant inclusions that work only in a narrow frequency band, limiting applications. Broadband and tunable MMs are needed to overcome this limit. This dissertation focuses on creating tunable and controllable MM structures through the manipulation of electromagnetic interactions between MM inclusions. We introduce three novel MM systems. Each system is studied computationally with CST-Studio, and experimentally via THz spectroscopy. First, we look at the tunable transmission spectrum of two coupled split ring resonators (SRRs) with different resonant frequencies. We show that introducing a lateral displacement between the two component resonators lowers the electromagnetic coupling between the SRRs, activating a new resonance. Second, we study an SRR array, coupled to a non-resonant closed ring array. We show that lowering the interaction strength through lateral displacement changes the MM oscillator strength by ~ 40% and electric field enhancement by a factor of 4. Finally, we show that interactions between a superconducting SRR array and a conducting ground plane result in a temperature and field strength dependent MM absorption. The peak absorption changes by ~ 40% with increasing electric field and by ~ 66% with increasing temperature.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectPhysicsen_US
dc.subjectInteractionsen_US
dc.subjectMetamaterialsen_US
dc.subjectNonlinearen_US
dc.subjectTerahertzen_US
dc.titleNear field interactions in terahertz metamaterialsen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2016-03-12T07:14:10Z
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePhysicsen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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