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dc.contributor.authorSumah, Awo Yayra
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-11T16:04:05Z
dc.date.available2016-04-11T16:04:05Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/15660
dc.description.abstractThe post-colonial period in many African countries was, and still is, marked by political breakdown, authoritarianism and war. African state institutions saw fragmentation, breakdown and in some cases, failure. For many Africanist scholars "state weakness" is a main cause for political violence. State weakness results from pre-colonial and colonial legacies which created authoritarian structures, supported the rise of autocratic political leaders and entrenched dysfunctional state practices. Dysfunctional state practices manifest themselves during civil wars when governments and national armies exploit and rape their civilian population, failing to provide security from rebel violence. This paper argues that dysfunctional state practices during civil war are enabled by a history of gender discourses and beliefs. In the wars of the Democratic Republic of Congo and in the Sierra Leonean war, when army soldiers abused and raped civilians, they were enabled by gendered hierarchies, norms and beliefs, which they employed to legitimize and normalize their actions.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectPolitical scienceen_US
dc.subjectAfrican statesen_US
dc.subjectCivil waren_US
dc.subjectColonialismen_US
dc.subjectGenderen_US
dc.subjectMasculinity and femininityen_US
dc.subjectPolitical violenceen_US
dc.titleGender discourses and state practices in civil war: a case study of the Democratic Republic of Congo and Sierra Leoneen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertation
dc.date.updated2016-04-08T20:07:44Z
etd.degree.nameM.A.en_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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