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dc.contributor.authorO'Toole, Patricken_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-16T15:37:17Z
dc.date.available2016-05-16T15:37:17Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/16279
dc.description.abstractVitamin D is an important secosteroid hormone that is responsible for calcium and phosphorus homeostasis. Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency are an ever increasing global problem. Very few foods naturally contain vitamin D; such as salmon, and sundried or ultraviolet irradiated mushrooms. Few foods are fortified with vitamin D such as milk, orange juice, cereal and bread. Little is known about the vitamin D levels in certain fish such as sardines. The purpose of this study was to find out whether sardines and mackerel are a good source of vitamin D such as wild salmon. It was hypothesized that both sardines and mackerel are a good source of vitamin D. Based on the results, sardines are a good source of vitamin D. One serving size (3.5 ounces, about 5 fish) of sardines has about 330.8 IU's of vitamin D3. This is equal to 66.2 IU's of vitamin D3 per fish. Mackerel on the other hand does not have as much vitamin D3 as sardines. A standard serving of mackerel (3.5 ounces, about 3 fish) has 81.6 IU's of vitamin D3. This is approximately 27.2 IU's of vitamin D3 per fish. Both mackerel and sardines are good sources of vitamin D3.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectEndocrinologyen_US
dc.subjectVitamin Den_US
dc.titleEvaluating the vitamin D content in sardines and mackerelen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2016-04-08T20:20:40Z
etd.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMedical Sciencesen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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