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dc.contributor.authorHsu, Michael Chih-Yuanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-07T17:37:31Z
dc.date.available2016-07-07T17:37:31Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/16817
dc.description.abstractThe intellectual impulsiveness of man to understand the unknown and the continual need of the society to improve healthcare have encouraged extensive investigation on numerous and diverse cause-and-effect relationships. The nature of this endeavor, however, renders the inability of investigator at all levels to escape beyond the narrow conceptual boundary described by an early French philosopher as the vicious cycle. To enjoy the theoretically plausible benefits of refined labor division, data-driven healthcare management, and real-time evidence-based practices, it must first be acknowledged that co-occurrence is better than cause-and-effect in explaining how an observation takes place at a particular time. This paper details a co-occurrence framework, and discusses its implications for the global healthcare system.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectMedicineen_US
dc.subjectBasic scienceen_US
dc.subjectClinical practiceen_US
dc.subjectClinical researchen_US
dc.subjectCo-occurrenceen_US
dc.subjectHealthcare managementen_US
dc.subjectWorld politicsen_US
dc.titleA co-occurrence framework conceptualized for bridging the gap between basic science, clinical research and clinical practicesen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2016-06-18T22:28:12Z
etd.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMedical Sciencesen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International