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dc.contributor.authorMichelman, Cherry Fabeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-08T19:38:54Z
dc.date.available2016-07-08T19:38:54Z
dc.date.issued1953
dc.date.submitted1953
dc.identifier.otherb14793325
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/16919
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractHypothesis: Shaw's influence was greatest in his contribution to Fabianism, and least in his pronouncements on foreign affairs. Shaw's ideas on foreign policy were grounded in his socialism, and his sympathy for totalitarian movements which diminished his influence on liberals, was dictated by belief that dictatorship was a short-cut to socialism. Conclusion: Shaw's socialism remained constant even when his liberalism wavered. In spite of his criticism of democracy, and his admiration for strong leadership, Shaw's Fabianism was essential to his thought, and his return to liberalism was inevitable. [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.titleThe political philosophy of George Bernard Shaw.en_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Political Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineGovernmenten_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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