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dc.contributor.authorRaphael, Vanessaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-12T12:31:08Z
dc.date.available2016-07-12T12:31:08Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/17004
dc.description.abstractThe tobacco cigarette industry is a multi-billion dollar industry that has continued to thrive at the expense of its consumer’s health. Through the use of their provocative, and often exaggerated advertising campaigns they have successfully been able to lure a great amount of customers, and have been able to retain most of them for years due to their products addictive nature. Unfortunately, many of their clientele are children as young as 13 years old. Their products have first started to appeal to these individuals when tobacco companies were allowed to use cartoon characters to represent their brands. It wasn’t until a ban forbidding tobacco companies to use cartoon characters or lovable-looking dromedary in cool clothes became effective in 1998, can a decrease of smoking in that age group be observed. Others in that age group and well into adult years were found to have initiated tobacco smoking for peer and self-validation purposes. This study was designed to analyze the attitudes of young adults towards tobacco smoking, and determine how knowledgeable they were about tooth loss and its associated health risks. Through the use of a questionnaire comprised of 19 questions and completed by young adults between the ages of 18 and 23, data was able to be collected and analyzed in order to form conclusions to answer some of these determinations. The data collected was analyzed by running some statistical tests with different variable combinations. In addition, tables and graphs were generated in order to have a clear illustrative image of what the data is meant to represent. Unfortunately, the data was found to be statistically insignificant except when examining tobacco smoking attitudes and knowledge against sex and race. Women were found to be more knowledgeable of the impacts that tobacco has on tooth loss and Asians/Hawaiians and Blacks were found to be less likely to strongly agree and/or more likely to disagree that smoking causes disease compared to other ethnic groups. Black participants were also found to less likely strongly agree and/or more likely to disagree that healthy smile equals a healthy body, and that missing teeth affect self-image.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectDentistryen_US
dc.titleKnowledge and attitudes about tobacco use and tooth loss among young adults.en_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2016-06-18T22:28:44Z
etd.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineOral Health Sciencesen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International