Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorStiner, Rachelen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T15:06:30Z
dc.date.available2016-07-13T15:06:30Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/17023
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Gliomas are the most common primary brain malignancy, with more than 16,000 patients diagnosed every year (Ostrom, et al., 2015). Outcomes vary widely depending on tumor grade and treatment, and have been steadily improving with the advent of new therapeutics. Glioma patients frequently undergo chemotherapy to remove residual tumor after surgery, and many of these cytotoxic therapies are known to affect rapidly dividing cells such as ovarian follicles (Vassilakopoulou et al., 2016). The negative effects of chemotherapy on fertility have been demonstrated in patients with breast and colorectal cancer (Bines, et al., 1996; Avastin Prescribing Information). Additionally, infertility has been linked with decreased quality of life, primarily in women (O’Moore et al., 1983; Greil, 1997). Fertility treatments are available for women undergoing cancer treatment, however it is unknown whether these treatments are routinely discussed with glioma patients before initiating chemotherapy. OBJECTIVE: The primary goal of this study was to assess whether female glioma patients are being effectively counselled on their possible loss of fertility and their choices for fertility treatment prior to beginning chemotherapy. To this end, it was also important to understand the barriers preventing patients from obtaining information related to their fertility. Another principle goal of this study was to describe the effects of chemotherapy on a sample of women with glioma. Finally, this study sought to understand the priorities of women with glioma in regards to family planning, and to address these priorities in the context of a comprehensive fertility preservation discussion. METHODS: To assess these endpoints, a survey was designed and delivered to patients being treated at the Neuro-oncology clinic of the University of California, San Francisco. Eligible candidates were identified prior to a clinic visit, and patients were asked whether they would like to participate in the survey. Consenting patients then completed the survey at home or in the clinic. Seventy two women completed the survey. Data was analyzed using STATA Software Version 10.0. RESULTS: Analysis of the survey results showed that only 35% of women receiving chemotherapy reported having a discussion regarding fertility preservation prior to beginning treatment. Of those who reported having this discussion, only 80% were aware that chemotherapy could negatively affect their fertility. Many women reported that while fertility preservation was not important to them at the time of diagnosis, it was a priority for them at the time of survey completion. Most women surveyed expressed a desire to have a fertility preservation discussion with a reproductive specialist. CONCLUSIONS: The data obtained in this study suggest a lack of understanding of the negative effects of chemotherapy which may be addressed with a more comprehensive fertility discussion with glioma patients prior to beginning treatment. Although interest in having children tends to decrease after cancer treatment, the majority of respondents still report wanting a child after treatment. The priorities of women in the study reflect a concern for the health of their future offspring which may be best addressed prior to beginning treatment in order to increase their chances of conceiving at a later date.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectMedicineen_US
dc.subjectFertilityen_US
dc.subjectGliomaen_US
dc.subjectNeuro-oncologyen_US
dc.subjectFertility preservationen_US
dc.titleAttitudes toward fertility and fertility preservation in women diagnosed with gliomaen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2016-06-20T19:57:55Z
etd.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMedical Sciencesen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record