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dc.contributor.authorTreadwell, Stephanieen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T15:15:15Z
dc.date.available2016-07-13T15:15:15Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/17025
dc.description.abstractPregnant women with substance use issues are a doubly at-risk group in desperate need of support. Using open-ended interviews, participant-observation, and media analysis, I examine the support provided by the Department of Children and Families (DCF) in Massachusetts for pregnant women who seek treatment at Project Empowerment. Project Empowerment provides prenatal care, maintenance therapy, and other services to expectant mothers who struggle with substance use issues. Drawing upon Foucault’s (1975) notion of surveillance, I explore how pregnant women with substance use issues are surveilled by agencies, and how these surveillance agencies structure their care and policies through their definitions of what it means to be a “good mother.” I argue that through the Department of Children and Families definition of the “good mother,” DCF produces an unintended paradox of support for pregnant women with substance use issues in Massachusetts.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectSocial researchen_US
dc.subjectAddictionen_US
dc.subjectPregnancyen_US
dc.subjectChild abuse and neglecten_US
dc.titleA paradox of support: the Department of Children and Families and their construction of the "good mother"en_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2016-06-20T19:57:57Z
etd.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMedical Anthropology and Cross-Cultural Practiceen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International