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dc.contributor.authorStrickland, III, Eldon M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-19T19:21:54Z
dc.date.available2016-07-19T19:21:54Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/17103
dc.description.abstractCombined with advancements in technology, prior research investigating the teacher-student relationship has radically changed the way we teach and learn in online education. This study examined the way teacher self-disclosure (TSD) influenced student motivation to enroll in an online course and altered their affect, or feelings, toward the teacher when applied within a purely online learning setting. The experiment took place online and was built within a Boston University’s learning management system (LMS), Blackboard Learn. In the online environment, TSD was controlled to provide high levels of male and female TSD in two treatment groups and a complete absence of TSD in two control groups. Out of the 336 Master of Social Work (MSW) students that responded to the recruitment email, 84 students were placed in one of four online settings led by fictional male and female teachers. Students in the treatment groups were granted access to male or female TSD via a Meet the Professor tab within the online learning environment. This tab provided students with access to content collected from social media websites, such as LinkedIn, Pinterest, YouTube, and Twitter on a single web page. The social media content displayed personal and professional information about these fictional instructors and were used to create TSD in the sample online course. The study participants were instructed to explore their assigned sample course not including (control) or including (treatment) TSD. Before and after exploring the sample course, participants completed pre- and post-surveys measuring their motivation to engage in the online course materials, their affect toward the teacher (ATT), and their perceptions of TSD within the online learning environment. Hypothesis testing using ANCOVA, correlation, t-test, and Chi-squared procedures revealed no statistical significance. Findings include recommendations for methodological requirement need to explore the complexities of the teacher-student relationship within a purely online learning environment.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectEducational technologyen_US
dc.subjectInstructional communication theoryen_US
dc.subjectLearning management systemsen_US
dc.subjectOnline learningen_US
dc.subjectStudent affect toward teacheren_US
dc.subjectStudent motivationen_US
dc.subjectTeacher self-disclosureen_US
dc.titleThe effect of teacher self-disclosure on student motivation and affect toward teacher in online educationen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2016-06-22T19:29:57Z
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Educationen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineCurriculum & Teachingen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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