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dc.contributor.authorDecarie, Linette A.
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-20T15:06:45Z
dc.date.available2016-07-20T15:06:45Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/17108
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines the relationship between living learning programs (LLPs) and student success at Boston University, a large, private research institution. The focus of this research was to better understand the distinctions between different types of living learning program formats (honors, academic, and special interest) and traditional housing in terms of the types of students they attract and what relationship they have with academic performance, retention, and student perception. Using the conceptual frameworks provided by Astin’s “I-E-O” model and Tinto’s longitudinal model of student departure, a mixed method design employing both quantitative (binary logistic and linear regression) and qualitative (interviews with LLP program faculty, staff, and student advisors) components was used. Results indicate that there were significant differences in student characteristics, academic performance, and perception between LLP participants and students in traditional housing. LLP participation was found to be positively related to retention, academic success and a student’s evaluation of the overall environment of the University. Academic LLP participation was linked to increased retention and first year cumulative GPA, while honors LLP participants were more inclined to rate their overall experience as excellent. These findings demonstrate that LLP format and composition are important in evaluating how these programs impact first year students. While research was limited to the students enrolled at a single institution, this study provides information about LLPs with varying level of academic integration, which can be useful to administrators looking to establish or review LLP programs on their own campus.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectHigher education administrationen_US
dc.subjectPerceptionen_US
dc.subjectRetentionen_US
dc.subjectUndergraduateen_US
dc.subjectAcademic successen_US
dc.subjectLiving learning programen_US
dc.titleExamining the effects of living learning programs on first year success of undergraduatesen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertation
dc.date.updated2016-06-22T19:30:00Z
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Educationen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineEducationen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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