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dc.contributor.authorPerez, Maia Williamsen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-20T18:28:46Z
dc.date.available2016-07-20T18:28:46Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/17116
dc.description.abstractWhen period instruments first appeared, audiences were highly skeptical of their musical value. It was not until the early-1900s—and performers like Arnold Dolmetsch—that they began to become not only accepted, but increasingly mandated for early music performances. However, while criticisms regarding their use persisted into the 1940s, it has never received the type of intense debate other details of performance practice have. Perhaps because of this lack, scholarship has also neglected to consider what ideological roles period instruments have played in historical performance. Why does the role of period instruments matter?  Partly because most writing about early music includes assumptions about them and their importance; for instance, mid-20th century performance practice guides implicitly assign them considerable authority over the ever-contested designation of “authenticity.” However, this is not the only role period instruments play. I argue that early advocates for period instruments like Arnold Dolmetsch used them to create a type of “intimacy” crucial to many aspects of performance practice. Created through both the instruments' materially and their timbres, this intimacy closes temporal and spatial historical gaps, allowing performers and their audiences to connect with distant musics in a modern way—and allowing “old” music to develop a living musical value.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectMusicen_US
dc.subjectArnold Dolmetschen_US
dc.subjectEarly musicen_US
dc.subjectFrances Galpinen_US
dc.subjectMaterial objectsen_US
dc.subjectPeriod instrumentsen_US
dc.titlePeriod instruments, material objects, and the making of the 20th–century early music revivalen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2016-06-22T19:30:07Z
etd.degree.nameMaster of Musicen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMusicologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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