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dc.contributor.authorFasano, Ann D.
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-22T18:07:48Z
dc.date.available2016-07-22T18:07:48Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/17129
dc.description.abstractA primary goal of the forensic anthropologist is assisting in the estimation of a post-mortem interval. This assessment is largely based upon the degree and quality of soft tissue decomposition, influenced by factors including temperature, humidity, insect activity, carnivore and rodent activity, perimortem trauma and the depositional environment. While the effects of temperature on decomposition have been long appreciated and initially studied, little or no research has been conducted on the disruption of insect activity and how that disturbance may affect the decomposition process. This study was designed to determine if the exposure of skin surface of porcine remains to insect repellant (specifically, DEET) has an effect on the presence and overall activity of insects during decomposition. Two experiments were conducted in the spring and fall with results indicating that insect repellant slows the rate of decomposition. Such findings are important for criminal investigators requiring an accurate estimation of post-mortem time to appreciate those factors that may adversely affect the process and rate of soft tissue deterioration.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectForensic anthropologyen_US
dc.subjectTissue decompositionen_US
dc.subjectPost-mortem intervalen_US
dc.titleThe effects of insect on soft tissue decompositionen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineAnatomy and Neurobiologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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