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dc.contributor.authorMorel, Melissa Nicoleen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-08T15:34:02Z
dc.date.available2016-09-08T15:34:02Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/17855
dc.description.abstractA rampant supposition exists that the judicial nominations of females are less successful due to the nominee’s gender (Martinek 2002). It is thus paramount to further investigate empirically whether individual nominee characteristics, such as gender, inhibit the nominee’s possibility of obtaining Senate confirmation. I empirically explore this conjecture in two distinct ways. First, I employ a difference in means test to determine whether women are confirmed to the District Court at a lower rate, on average, than are men. Subsequently, I test the hypothesis using a logistic regression that examines the influence of gender and the interaction of gender and race on the likelihood of confirmation, while controlling for other factors. Aiming to contribute to previous scholarship by providing an updated empirical analysis, I offer an update to Wendy Martinek’s original analysis of judicial confirmations by using the Lower Federal Court Confirmation Database to examine whether the influences of gender, race and their interaction on confirmation dynamics vary by partisan control. Having found the effect that nonwhite women are less likely to be confirmed by a GOP Senate than white males, I examine whether gender and race are the key factors or whether the relationship may instead be driven by ideology. Despite popular belief, the analysis of the data is not supportive of an extensive gender gap and undermines the claim that gender alone is an imperative factor inhibiting women from obtaining a successful confirmation. However, the empirical results are supportive of the hypothesis that racial minority females are less likely to be confirmed by a GOP controlled Senate than their white female and male counterparts.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectPolitical scienceen_US
dc.subjectDistrict Courten_US
dc.subjectLower Federal Courten_US
dc.subjectGender and race politicsen_US
dc.subjectJudicial politicsen_US
dc.subjectSenate confirmationen_US
dc.titleA woman’s place is in the House, the Senate, just not the Judiciary? An empirical analysis of the relationship between a nominee’s gender and the Senate confirmation processen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2016-08-11T16:35:26Z
etd.degree.nameM.A.en_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US
dc.date.online2016-07-01


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